Whisky Dog

(Whisky vs Whiskey - see below)
Whisky Dog</br><h6>(Whisky vs Whiskey - see below)</h6>
The Whisky Dog is a unique drinking flask made from copper and brass.  According to the Scots: "Originally used by distillery workers in the early 1900s to pilfer drams of whisky from ageing barrels, the dog was fashioned from sheets of steel or copper with a coin welded at one end and a cork in the other."
"The thieves would dip the cylinder into the barrel, filling it with whisky, before replacing the stopper. They would then hang the long, cylindrical device down the inside of their trouser leg from a rope tied to their belt to avoid being caught – a crime that carried a sentence of immediate dismissal."
"As such the device was named ‘a dog’, because 'it never leaves your side, and is a whisky man’s best friend'."
These are hand machined on manual equipment, a patina is applied and they are then finished with vintage brass chain secured in place with copper rivets.  The brass belt ring on the chain is also hand machined from 360 brass and is then aged to match.  At over 1 pound, these are heavy and have a great feel in the hand while holding about 2oz of your favorite libation.
It has now become a tradition at our family's social events to "Do the Dog!" and take a shot of bourbon straight from the Whisky Dog!
Dimensions: ~8.5" long X 1" diameter.
The brass version tips the scales at just over 1 pound, with the copper coming in slightly heavier. 
 *Note -  High West Whisky and the High West logo are copyright High West Distillery.  Logo not included.  Please contact us if you are interested in doing a custom logo.
Whisky Vs. Whiskey
Whether it is whisky or whiskey has been the basis of many arguments over many years. The Scots spell it whisky and the Irish spell it whiskey, with an extra 'e'. This difference in the spelling comes from the translations of the word from the Scottish and Irish Gaelic forms. Whiskey with the extra 'e' is also used when referring to American whiskies. This 'e' was taken to the United States by the Irish immigrants in the 1700s and has been used ever since.
$109